Montessori children are easily adaptable. They have learned to work independently and in groups. Since they’ve been encouraged to make decisions at an early age, these children are problem solvers who can make choices and manage their time well. They have also been encouraged to exchange ideas and to discuss their work freely with others and good communication skills ease the way in new settings. 

The habits and skills which a child develops in a Montessori classroom are good for a lifetime. They will help him to work more efficiently, to observe more carefully and to concentrate more effectively, no matter where he goes If he is in a stimulating environment, whether at home or at school, his self-education – which is the only real education – will continue. 

Research has shown that the best indicator of future success is a sense of self-esteem. Montessori programs, based on self-directed, non-competitive activities, help children develop good self images and the confidences to face challenges and change with optimism. The Montessori approach helps develop a sense of personal responsibility that is not limited by constant comparison to others. This personal responsibility will help them make sense of the competitive world. 

Montessori develops the whole child. Academics and knowledge-building are key qualities of Montessori, as is the ability to think creatively and understand the needs of others. With the strong emotional, behavioural, and moral foundation, children become motivated, active, and independent learners who are prepared for the real world.

After Montessori